Stories

Take a minute to scroll through our stories researched by some of Canada's best writers, bloggers and influencers. They have experienced every B.C. and Alberta mountain resort to bring you the latest news on your favourite snow destinations. They explored the runs, glades and backcountry but also dug deep to bring you the details about other activities to round out your day or ski vacation. In B.C., learn about the snowshoe trails in Golden, the ice climbing wall at Big White, the cross-country trails at Sun Peaks or the fat-tire biking at Kimberley. In Alberta tempt yourself with the stories about cat-skiing at Castle Mountain, après ski fun in Banff National Park and fine dining at the top of Norquay. Don't forget the hidden gems in Northern BC and yes, the prairies of Alberta - we've decided they shouldn't be secrets anymore. Click and #DareToExplore.

  • As the sun comes up over Hamilton House, just east of Cold Lake in the Bonnyville region, Alexa Prodaniuk and Trevor Makaruk are tucking into a hearty breakfast of scrambled eggs, sausage, fruit and steaming hot scones, courtesy of Debbie Hamilton. Along with her husband Brian, she hosts their guests at Hamilton House Bed and Breakfast (although as Brian says, “she’s the boss.”)

  • It’s not every day someone heads to the middle of B.C. to experience Fort St. James and a ski hill with soul, aka, @MurrayRidge. But WinterFest is happening through February and that made us want to check it out, so SnowSeekers dispatched Smithers-based photographer Marty Clements to learn what this festival is all about.

  • Alvin Lee hadn’t laid eyes on snow until three years ago, at the age of 33 while on a trip to Japan. He thought the strange looking white stuff was piles of plastic, he recalls, chuckling at the thought.

  • Climbing behind the “wheel” of a Sherp is a surreal experience, beginning with the lack of wheel itself. This large, near-indestructible, amphibious tank of a vehicle has a manual transmission and two large levers to pivot and turn left and right. Its wheels are as tall as the average adult, and the squat body of the thing hunches over them, keeping a low profile (if that is possible for such a wild contraption).

  • A historic rock cairn, rimed and grey, looks out over Lake Athabasca. With her gloved hand, Hanna Bishop brushes the hoar shards from the bronze plaque, revealing the historic majesty of the Canadian north. Where we are standing is the spot on which stood the North West Company’s most important trading post, Fort Chipewyan, founded in 1788.

  • Archer is ready to go skiing. He’s so excited his body is shaking. As he moves from one to the other of our group, he nudges us, looking at us imploringly, as if to say, “Are you ready now? Are you ready now?”

  • A nervous grin spreads across Ginger Dumais’ face as she picks up speed, reaching the edge of control coming down a steeper pitch on the run Will-o-way at Nitehawk Adventure Park, outside Grande Prairie. Her expression is part thrill, part fear. In the split seconds of her descent, it’s hard to tell which will win out, and whether she’ll manage to stay upright.

  • Over the span of a few hours at Wapiti Nordic Ski Club in Grande Prairie, Breanna Gordon has managed to get snow down her back, up her front and all over her friends Lori Brough and Gillian Lockhart.

  • If you don’t live on Vancouver Island, you might not know VanIsle has a ski hill. But here’s another secret - the island has two!

  • Snow sloughs over the hump of the large cliff I’m standing above, trickling down over the rocks below. I wait poised on the shoulder of a spiny chute dropping into the new Tres Hombres area, via the second gate off Marmot Basin’s Paradise area.

  • Quesnel is a town of about 10,000 people and 13,000 more in the surrounding area - a lot larger than we expected, and there’s a reason for that. 

  • Surrounded by 360 degrees of mountains, the locals in Smithers have nothing but smiles, stoke and love for the community. We spoke with four residents, business owners and managers who have carved out lives for themselves from the valley floor to the mountain tops. 

  • The longest T-Bar in North America. Check. A volunteer-run snowboard and ski school. Check. And one of the coziest lodges anywhere. Check. Welcome to the best-kept secret in B.C.’s north – Murray Ridge Ski Resort & Terrain Park – that easily ticks off all the boxes for your next skiing or riding adventure. 

  • There are many reasons someone might want to switch from snowboarding to skiing. Take Amber Grant for instance. She was getting fed up with the hassle of cat tracks and the hard falls that come with snowboarding. So ger husband, Ben, convinced her to try a lesson in the Next Step program for skiing at Marmot Basin.

  • Aren’t we lucky to live in a city with so many activities to choose from? Each season offers tons of reasons to get outside and enjoy the environment. Yes, winter in Calgary can be brutally cold. But those nasty days are actually very few. With some good clothing choices, you can leave the house and have a heap of winter fun. There are lots of outdoor options that can be done on a skinny budget right here in Calgary. Here are our top six ideas to help you enjoy the beauty of winter.