Interior Alberta

Ski hills heading into 2020 are going to have to be innovative to stay alive; continuing to offer up experiences that ensure their audiences not only keep coming back, but offerings that bring their friends and family along with.

Grande Prairie, AB – Closing in on 60 years of serving the communities which surround it, Nitehawk Year-Round Adventure Park was happy to say that with the hard work of its snow making crews, the resort was able to have a soft opening on Nov. 17.

Cold Lake, AB – You have to love alpine fans. Nothing will deter them, not even living on the Prairies. Prairie topography may be devoid of mountains, but it’s not devoid of big hills and alpine fans definitely make use of them.

NiteHawk is a full service, year round regional family recreation facility featuring skiing, snowboarding, mountain biking, luge and a campground.

You know your kids are pumped and impressed by the scenery when they’re snapping photos and singing songs about snow from the back seat as you’re driving down the highway.


That’s what’s happening in our car as we wind our way down highways 507 and 774 toward Pincher Creek.

With its rolling prairie hills and mountain views, a recent visit to Pincher Creek and Castle Mountain Resort, gave our family of four an epic day of skiing. But more than that, it stole all of our hearts. We’ve classified it as a perfect southern Alberta family getaway that we won’t forget. Here are our three reasons why.

As a skier raising three little skiers in Alberta, it always feels a little strange going east instead of west in winter, until I’m there and then it all makes sense.

“I can almost connect my turns!” first-time snowboarder, Ivy Folkhard says, grinning from ear to ear. She’s been on a snowboard for little more than an hour, but has already mastered the basics. Edward Ford, Pass Powderkeg Snow School Instructor extraordinaire, gives her a high five before checking on the rest of the family. While Cohen, 8, works hard to keep up to his 10- year-old sister, Berkeley, 5, laughs as she falls in the snow again. “You’re doing that on purpose!” Edward teases.

On April 29, 1903 at 4:10 a.m., 82 million tons of rock broke off Turtle Mountain’s summit and came hurtling down on the sleeping town of Frank. While the slide avoided the main part of town, at least 90 people were killed. The Frank Slide Interpretive Centre describes what life was like before, during, and after the disaster, and shares amazing tales of heroism and survival through modern, hands-on exhibits.